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How To Reduce Your Toxic Load, According To an Integrative Doctor

The term “toxic load” refers to a build-up or accumulation of toxic chemicals and other substances within the body. Living in the western world, these substances are everywhere, from the polluted air we breathe to mould (often found in our homes), cigarettes and pesticides. Traditional cleaning products, some foods, and even some beauty products are also unsuspecting culprits.

In a healthy body, toxic products are properly metabolised, but if the loads become too high, or the body is unable to properly detox them, huge health issues can arise. To learn how to reduce and manage your toxic load effectively, we enlisted the help of our dear friend, Doctor Jenny Bromberger. As an integrative doctor, Dr. Jenny is trained in both nutritional and environmental medicine, and understands that you must look at both when it comes to treating disease. Read on her for expertise.

 

What are some symptoms that might indicate a high toxic chemical load within the body?

“We are all highly exposed to toxicants, but some people are more sensitive. They might notice that they feel more fatigued often or develop headaches round certain products – a good example is around synthetic fragrances. Other people do not experience any obvious warning signs, but chemicals are constantly disrupting vital processes in the body. This is why there has been a staggering rise in the prevalence of autoimmune disease in the western world.”

What are some ways to work at reducing these toxic chemicals?

“Infrared saunas and oral binding agents can somewhat reduce certain toxicants from the body. Eating a very healthy diet high in natural and plant-based foods will also improve resilience. But ultimately, we have to reduce our exposure if we want to stay healthy. Otherwise, it is like trying to keep a car clean when it is continuously left out in the rain. Ensuring you home is free from moulds, and detoxing your beauty and cleaning products is a great place to start. Avoiding highly processed foods, washing pesticides off produce, and abstaining from smoking also help a great deal.”

When it comes to makeup and skincare products, what are some toxic ingredients to look out for?

“Some beauty products unfortunately carry a very high concentration of chemicals such as phthalates, PEG’s, parabens, toluene, formaldehyde and siloxanes, plus hundreds of others. You’ll find them in everything from cleansing products and soaps to make up and hair care. These chemicals damage cell division, and other vital biological functions.”

How have you personally cleaned up your beauty routine to reduce your exposure to toxic chemicals?

“I use only organic, chemical free soaps and shampoos. The term “certified organic” is an excellent and trusted marker in Australia because it is proof of a very high and clean beauty standard. Agent Nateur and Aika are excellent brands that I often use. I do tell my patients to go to the Bond Clean Beauty website as a trusted beauty retailer. It’s a huge time-saver, because you know everything is curated, and only the cleanest make it through.”

 

Our clean beauty favourites:

Agent Nateur Holi (Stick) Sensitive Deodorant: Free of toxic aluminium, this clean deodorant is reliable on humid days, and won’t stain your clothing.”

Aika Pitta Body Anoint: The skin covering your body is a much larger surface area than your face, so if you’re new to clean beauty, it’s a great place to start before transitioning your dedicated facial skincare. This completely clean, Ayurveda-inspired body oil smells lush, and leaves even the driest of limbs hydrated and glossy.”

Agent Nateur Holi (Oil) Refining Youth Serum: Packed with organic oils and Bulgarian rose, this hydrating oil will soothe, calm, and nourish dry, sensitised skins. It leaves a fresh glow, and works brilliantly morning or night after cleansing.”

 

Words and interview by Emily Algar.

Dr Jenny Bromberger can be found at jennybromberger.com